Ukraine-/Russia-related Sanctions

Ukraine-/Russia-related Sanctions

1009

Answer

No.  E.O. 14065 targets the so-called Donetsk People’s Republic and Luhansk People’s Republic regions of Ukraine or such other regions of Ukraine as may be determined by the Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the Secretary of State (collectively, the “Covered Regions”).  In determining whether a location is within the regions subject to sanctions, U.S. persons may reasonably rely on vetted information from reliable third parties, such as postal codes and maps.

U.S. persons engaging in activity that does not involve the Covered Regions are not subject to the prohibitions in E.O. 14065.  Please see FAQ 1006 for what prohibitions apply to the Covered Regions. 

Date Updated: May 05, 2022

Date Released
March 2, 2022

1008

Answer

Yes.  Through 12:01 a.m. eastern daylight time on March 23, 2022, Ukraine-related General License 17 authorizes transactions that are ordinarily incident and necessary to the wind down of transactions involving the so-called Donetsk People’s Republic (DNR) and Luhansk People’s Republic (LNR) regions of Ukraine.  Given the comprehensive nature of the sanctions on these regions, these activities include the divestiture or transfer to a non-U.S. person of a U.S. person’s share of ownership in any pre-February 21, 2022 investment located in the DNR or LNR regions of Ukraine, and the winding down of operations, contracts, or other agreements in effect prior to February 21, 2022 involving the exportation, reexportation, sale, or supply of goods, services, or technology to, or importation of any goods, services, or technology from, the DNR or LNR regions of Ukraine.

Date Released
March 2, 2022

1007

Answer

U.S. persons are authorized through a variety of Ukraine-related general licenses (GLs) to support certain humanitarian efforts and other activity in the Covered Regions, including transactions related to the export of food or medicine, the response to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the official business of an international organization, or the activities of nongovernmental organizations, as well as personal remittances, telecommunications, internet services, and mail.

  • GL 18 authorizes certain transactions that are ordinarily incident and necessary to:  (1)  the exportation or reexportation of agricultural commodities, medicine, medical devices, replacement parts and components for medical devices, or software updates for medical devices to the Covered Regions, or to persons in third countries purchasing specifically for resale to the Covered Regions; or (2) the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of COVID-19 (including research or clinical studies relating to COVID-19).
  • GL 19 authorizes certain transactions related to telecommunications that are ordinarily incident and necessary to the receipt or transmission of telecommunications in the Covered Regions, as well as certain transactions of common carriers involving the Covered Regions that are ordinarily incident and necessary to the receipt or transmission of mail and packages.
  • GL 20 authorizes transactions for the conduct of the official business of certain international organizations and entities.  For an organizational chart of the United Nations, which lists the Programmes, Funds, and Other Entities and Bodies, as well as the Specialized Agencies and Related Organizations covered by GL 19, see the following page on the United Nations website: https://www.un.org/en/pdfs/un_system_chart.pdf.
  • GL 21 authorizes certain transactions that are ordinarily incident and necessary to the transfer of noncommercial, personal remittances to or from the Covered Regions or for or on behalf of an individual ordinarily resident in the Covered Regions.  Further, GL 21 authorizes certain transactions that are ordinarily incident and necessary to maintaining, operating, or closing an account of an individual ordinarily resident in the Covered Regions.  U.S. depository institutions, U.S.-registered brokers or dealers in securities, and U.S.-registered money transmitters are authorized to process noncommercial, personal remittances pursuant to GL 21 regardless of whether the originator or beneficiary is an individual who is a U.S. person.  GL 21 is not limited to a specific method of payment.
  • GL 22 authorizes certain transactions that are ordinarily incident and necessary to the exportation or reexportation, directly or indirectly, from the United States or by U.S. persons, wherever located, to persons in the Covered Regions, of services incident to the exchange of personal communications over the internet as well as the export of software to enable such services.  However, GL 22 does not authorize the exportation or reexportation, directly or indirectly, of services or software with knowledge or reason to know that such services or software are intended for any person whose property and interests in property are blocked. 
  • GL 23 authorizes certain transactions that are ordinarily incident and necessary to the support of nongovernmental organizations’ activities in the Covered Regions, including activities related humanitarian projects to meet basic human needs, democracy building, education, non-commercial developments projects, and environmental and natural resource protection.  Such transactions may include the processing and transfer of funds, payment of taxes, fees, and import duties, and purchase or receipt of permits, licenses, or public utility services

Date Updated: 03/11/2022

Date Released
March 2, 2022

1006

Answer

E.O. 14065 prohibits the following activities with the so-called Donetsk People’s Republic and Luhansk People’s Republic regions of Ukraine and such other regions of Ukraine as may be determined by the Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the Secretary of State (collectively, the “Covered Regions”):  (i) new investment in the Covered Regions by a U.S. person, wherever located; (ii) the importation into the United States, directly or indirectly, of any goods, services, or technology from the Covered Regions; (iii) the exportation, reexportation, sale, or supply, directly or indirectly, from the United States or by a U.S. person, wherever located, of any goods, services, or technology to the Covered Regions; and (iv) any approval, financing, facilitation, or guarantee by a U.S. person, wherever located, of a transaction by a foreign person where the transaction by that foreign person would be prohibited if performed by a U.S. person, or within the United States.

In addition, E.O. 14065 authorizes sanctions against persons that:  operate or have operated in the Covered Regions since February 21, 2022; are or have been a leader, official, senior executive officer, or member of the board of directors since February 21, 2022 of an entity operating in the Covered Regions; are owned or controlled by, or to have acted or purported to act for or on behalf of, directly or indirectly, any person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to E.O. 14065; or have materially assisted, sponsored, or provided financial, material, or technological support for, or goods or services to or in support of, any person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to E.O. 14065.  All property and interests in property of persons designated pursuant to E.O. 14065 that are or come within the United States or the possession or control of U.S. persons are blocked, and U.S. persons are generally prohibited from engaging in transactions with them.  Additionally, any entities 50 percent or more owned, directly or indirectly, by one or more blocked persons are also blocked. 

Date Released
March 2, 2022

920

Answer

The announced import restrictions related to the permanent importation of firearms and ammunition that are the growth, product, or manufacture of the Russian Federation will be implemented by the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF).  OFAC has concurred with the Deputy Secretary of State’s determination pursuant to the CBW Act regarding the imposition of import restrictions, and with ATF’s implementation of the restrictions according to State Department guidance.  

For information about the sanctions announced by the State Department pursuant to the CBW Act on August 20, 2021, please see the relevant State Department press statement and Federal Register Notice.  For additional guidance regarding the import restrictions, please review the related Fact Sheet published by the State Department.

Date Released
August 20, 2021

919

Answer

The prohibitions announced by the State Department on August 20, 2021 related to U.S. bank loans have the same scope as those imposed by OFAC in August 2019 under the CBW Act Directive.  Please see FAQs 675678 for additional information.

Independent of the CBW Act Directive, OFAC has imposed prohibitions on certain Russia-related sovereign entities subject to the CBW Act Directive, pursuant to Russia-related directives under Executive Order (E.O.) 14024 (see FAQ 1000).

Date Updated: March 02, 2022

Date Released
August 20, 2021

870

Answer

With respect to a person on the NS-MBS List subject to section 235(a)(3) of CAATSA, as implemented by section 1(a)(i) of Executive Order (E.O.) 13849, U.S. financial institutions are prohibited from making loans or providing credits to the identified person totaling more than $10,000,000 in any 12-month period, unless the person is engaged in activities to relieve human suffering and the loans or credits are provided for such activities.  This is not a blocking sanction, but rather a limit on the total amount of loans or credits that can be provided to the identified person within the specified time period by a U.S. financial institution, excluding loans or credit provided to such identified person for activities to relieve human suffering.  

Each U.S. financial institution must limit its provision of loans or credits to the identified person to $10,000,000 in any 12-month period, regardless of whether part or all the loans or credits in question has been repaid during the period.  This sanction is not a limit on the total loans or credits from all United States financial institutions collectively in the specific time period, but rather an institution-by-institution limit.

Date Released
January 5, 2021

869

Answer

No.  If a person is listed on OFAC’s Non-SDN Menu-Based Sanctions List (NS-MBS List) as subject to only a combination of the sanctions described in section 235(a)(1-8) and (10-11) of CAATSA, as implemented by Executive Order (E.O.) 13849, these non-blocking sanctions do not apply to an entity owned 50 percent or more, individually or in the aggregate, directly or indirectly, by such sanctioned person or persons, unless OFAC separately lists the owned entity on the NS-MBS List as subject to the same sanctions.  

However, section 235(a)(9) of CAATSA, as implemented by section 1(a)(iv) of E.O. 13849, blocks the property and interests in property of the sanctioned person, and a person subject to that sanction will be added to OFAC’s Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List (SDN List).  The property and interests in property of persons on the SDN List are blocked, and any entity owned 50 percent or more, individually or in the aggregate, directly or indirectly, by blocked persons is itself blocked, as described in OFAC’s 50 Percent Rule.  

Individuals sanctioned under section 235(a)(12) of CAATSA (Sanctions on Principal Executive Officers), as implemented by section 1(a)(vi) of E.O. 13849, may be subject to any of the sanctions described in section 235(a).  To the extent that the sanctions selected are solely non-blocking sanctions, such person will be listed on the NS-MBS List.  Conversely, if the sanctioned individual is subject to the sanction described in section 235(a)(9), the individual is blocked and placed on the SDN List, and the 50 Percent Rule applies.

Date Released
January 5, 2021

678

Answer

No, the CBW Act Directive does not prohibit U.S. banks from participating in the secondary market for Russian sovereign debt.  However, independent of the CBW Act Directive, OFAC has imposed prohibitions on certain Russia-related sovereign entities subject to the CBW Act Directive, pursuant to Russia-related directives under Executive Order (E.O.) 14024 (see FAQ 1000).

Date Updated: March 02, 2022

Date Released
August 3, 2019

677

Answer

The CBW Act Directive imposes long-term costs on Russia for its brazen use of chemical weapons and its failure to meet the conditions described in the CBW Act, including the failure to provide reliable assurances that Russia would not engage in future chemical weapons attacks. The Government of the Russian Federation cannot leverage U.S. banks for future non-ruble denominated sovereign bond offerings or benefit from non-ruble denominated loans provided by U.S. banks.

Date Released
August 3, 2019