How to Do Business with Treasury

Part I: Introduction

Foreword

Regulations Governing Department of the Treasury Acquisition

Basic Contracting Principles

Major Differences Between Commercial and Government Practices

The Government Definition of a "Small Business"

Part II: Procurement Procedures

Purchasing Practices

Micro-purchases

Simplified Acquisitions

Simplified Acquisition Awards

Formal Contract Procedures

Sealed Bidding

Negotiated Procurement

Tips for Formal Contract Awards

Small Business Administration and Preferential Contracting Programs

Unsolicited Proposals

Subcontracting Opportunities

Part III: Treasury Who's Who

Departmental Procurement Policy

Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization

Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization - Overview

Competition Advocacy Program

Small Business Opportunities

Part IV: Treasury Bureaus Who's Who

Part V: Treasury Expiring Contracts

How To Do Business With Treasury Part I: Regulations Governing Department of the Treasury Acquisition

Most Treasury acquisition activities are governed by the "Federal Acquisition Regulation" (FAR). (The U.S. Mint is exempt.) The FAR is codified as Chapter 1 of Title 48, Code of Federal Regulations and consists of procurement policies and many detailed procedural and administrative requirements that apply to all procurements by Federal executive agencies.

The FAR has more than 1,000 pages and is divided into 53 parts (equivalent to chapters), each part dealing with a separate aspect of procurement. The first six parts deal with general government contracting matters and the next six parts deal with aspects of acquisition planning. Part 13 contains simplified procedures for contracts of $150,000 or less, while Parts 14 and 15 deal with procurement procedures for larger contracts. Other parts deal with such matters as labor laws, contract administration, standard clauses, and forms.

Any firm wishing to do business with the Federal Government should have access to the FAR. A copy may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402, telephone (202) 512-1800. The FAR is also available for review at major public libraries, or via the World Wide Web from the Acquisition Reform Network.

Part I: Basic Contracting Principles

Before looking at the regulations in detail, you should be aware of four basic principles underlying Department of the Treasury and federal agencies' contracting process.

First, to ensure reasonable prices, contracts are awarded competitively whenever possible. This practice reflects the theory that full and open competition results in fair and reasonable prices and that such competition avoids favoritism by assuring that all qualified suppliers have the opportunity to sell to the government.

Second, contracts are awarded only to contractors found to be "responsive" and "responsible." Regardless of the procurement method used, the regulations require that, before the contract is awarded, the contracting officer must assure that a prospective contractor is "responsive" and "responsible."

To be considered responsive, the contractor must submit a sealed bid or proposal in accordance with the terms and conditions of the quotation or solicitation. For example, the bid or proposal must be submitted in a timely manner to the location stated in the Government’s requirements.

To be considered responsible, the contractor must meet the following conditions:

  • Have, or be able to obtain, adequate financial resources.
  • Be able to comply with the delivery requirements.
  • Have a satisfactory record of performance.
  • Have a satisfactory record of integrity and business ethics.
  • Have, or be able to obtain, the necessary organization, experience, accounting and operational controls, and technical skills.
  • Have, or be able to obtain, the necessary production, construction, and technical equipment and facilities.
  • Be otherwise qualified and eligible to receive an award under applicable laws and regulations.

These determinations are generally based on the contracting officer's evaluation of contractor's data and records of prior performance.

In the case of small business, special rules apply. If a contracting officer finds that the small business that offered the lowest price is not responsible, the case must be referred to the Small Business Administration (SBA). The SBA then notifies the small business of the contracting officer's finding and offers it an opportunity to apply for a Certificate of Competency (COC). If the small business applies for a COC, the SBA reviews the findings and makes its own determination as to whether the small business is responsible. If it finds the small business responsible, the SBA issues a COC to the contracting officer. Except in some unusual circumstances, the contracting officer must then abide by the SBA's decision and award the contract to the small business firm.

Third, the type of contract issued must be appropriate for the particular procurement. The regulations authorize the use of several different types of contracts and describe the circumstances appropriate for the use of each. The type of contract used in each procurement should be determined by the circumstances of the procurement and the degree of risk associated with performance of the contract.

Fourth, the Department of the Treasury procurement program is used to help implement various national social and economic policies. Some of those policies are implemented by mandatory contract provisions, such as those requiring that minimum standards for wages, hours, and working conditions be met in producing supplies or performing services under a Department of the Treasury contract. Other policies are furthered by laws requiring contracts to be awarded to certain contractors or prohibiting their award to others. For example, certain items must be purchased from Federal Prison Industries, Inc., and contracting with a company convicted of violating air pollution standards is prohibited. A third method of implementing national policies is the use of special procurement techniques, such as set-asides for small businesses, HUBZone set-asides, women-owned small businesses, service disabled veteran owned small businesses, and 8(a) procurements. Although there is no direct set-asides for small disadvantaged businesses, a goal exist for this category.

Part I: Foreword

The mission of the Department of the Treasury includes formulating and recommending financial, tax, and fiscal policies, serving as financial agent for the U.S. Government, enforcing various Federal laws, and manufacturing coins and currency. Accomplishing this mission requires the procurement of a wide variety of commercial goods and services at an annual expenditure of appropriated and non-appropriated funds in excess of $3 billion.

Procurement authority has been delegated to the various bureaus of the Department, each conducting the procurement transactions necessary to carry out its respective program. Treasury's procurement efforts include a commitment to increase its contract awards to small, minority, women, HUBZone, service disabled veteran, and veteran owned business firms.

The diversity and wide distribution of Treasury programs can make it difficult for business representatives to determine how to best market products and services. To meet this challenge, the information contained in this guide includes contact points, procurement procedures, and general information about the responsibilities of each bureau.

We invite and encourage your participation in Treasury procurement program. Thank you for your interest in doing business with the Department of the Treasury.

Part I: Introduction

"Doing Business with the Department of the Treasury" is designed to assist small businesses in doing business with the Department of the Treasury and its bureaus. This guide includes information about the 10 bureaus within the Treasury as well as information about the Federal procurement process used by the Treasury to acquire goods and services. The guide has been divided into major topics for your convenience.

Part I: Major Differences Between Commercial and Government Practices

Doing business in the private sector is in some ways similar to doing business with the Department of the Treasury, but government contracting also has some unique aspects that you should be aware of

  • The Department of the Treasury conducts its business through authorized agents called Contracting Officers. Only Contracting Officers with valid warrants may sign contracts and enter into binding agreements with your company.
  • Unlike your commercial customers, the Department of the Treasury, under certain conditions, has the unilateral right to revise its contracts. While you are entitled to equitable adjustments in price and/or delivery time resulting from such revisions, you are committed to fulfill the contract as changed.
  • The Department of the Treasury is given extensive audit and work surveillance rights under its contracts. You are obligated to maintain and retain certain contract records and to submit them for audit on demand. Should such audits reveal a failure to conform to contract requirements, you may be subject to penalties or price adjustments.
  • The Department of the Treasury uses its procurement program to attain numerous national, social, and economic goals. If you participate in a Department of the Treasury contract, you may have to cooperate and comply with various programs to assist with achieving those goals.
  • Certain types of contracts limit the amount of profit you can earn and the amounts and types of costs you may recover.
  • The Department of the Treasury has an absolute right to terminate all or any part of your contract at any time either for convenience of the government (with appropriate compensation to you) or for default if your performance is unsatisfactory.

Part I: The Government Definition of a "Small Business"

Everyone knows that there is a big size difference between a major corporation such as General Motors and the locally-owned convenience store on the corner. But where does your business fit in? Is it "small", and if so, what happens when your business grows? When does it cease to be small?

The designation is important when you begin to deal with the Department of the Treasury and other federal and state governments. Because many of the programs and services we offer are targeted specifically toward "small" businesses, a definition of the possible participants is necessary.

The Small Business Administration (SBA) has taken the lead in defining what constitutes a small business in the eyes of the federal government, and the SBA’s definition is the most widely used.

This body of definitions is called "size standards" and can be found in Title 13 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 121. Small business is defined using size guidelines for the different categories of business enterprises, which include agricultural production, communications, manufacturing, retail, service, transportation and warehousing, and wholesale. Subcategories are included under each of these headings.

Size is determined by the amount of average annual receipts or by the number of employees. Service businesses generally have a size standard that would be determined by averaging your gross annual receipts for the last three years. This average is then linked to the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) code for the procurement you are looking to compete under. If your average annual receipts falls under the amount designated for that NAICS code, then your firm is considered to be small by definition. For example, if you were selling Computer Programming Services under NAICS code 541511 your average annual receipts over the past three years would have to be below $21.0 million to qualify as a small business concern. For most manufacturing NAICS codes, the number of employees will be used as a size standard. For example, a mining firm is considered "small" if it has fewer than 500 employees.

Because the body of definitions is complex and constantly changing, expert advice is essential to determine whether your business is "small." For more information, please contact the Small Business Administration or examine a listing of NAIC codes.

Part II: Micropurchases

Micro-Purchases are purchases under $3,000.00

  • No Competition Required (Only One Source Needs to Be Contacted)
  • Any Type of Business May Be Contacted (Large or Small). However, Use of Small Businesses Are Encouraged
  • Purchases Are Usually Made by Use of the Government Purchase Card

Part II: Purchasing Practices

Commonly-used office supplies, office furniture and furnishings and office machines are usually obtained from mandatory sources or through Federal Supply Schedule Contract sources, as appropriate. Other purchases may be made by placing an order through the use of a government purchase card for micro-purchases, issuing a purchase order under simplified acquisition procedures, or award of a formal contract pursuant to sealed bidding or negotiation procedures.

After the consideration of required sources (see FAR Part 8), the contracting officer is faced with a major choice: the use of a pre-existing contract vehicle or open market procedures. One widely used pre-existing contract vehicle is the GSA Federal Supply Schedule. Here is a diagram of the major choice (please note that both choices have small business opportunities):

Pre-existing contract vehicle OR Open market procurement

For example, the contracting officer may consider the GSA Federal Supply Schedule to meet the requirement by placing a task or delivery order against a GSA schedule contract; in order to be small business friendly, we consider small businesses of all types that are on the GSA Schedule. This same approach may also be used for other pre-existing vehicles such as Treasury wide or Government wide contracts.

Therefore, in this example, if the products or services that your firms provide is available via the GSA Federal Supply Schedule, please consider contacting GSA to learn how to become a schedule holder.

 

At this point, the contracting officer follows the procedures at FAR 19 (there is no order of precedence for set-asides):

1) Small Business Set-Aside;

2) HUBZone Set-Aside;

3) Service Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business Set-Aside;

4) Women Owned Small Business or Economically Disadvantaged Women Owned Small Business Set-Aside;

5) 8(a); and

6) Full and Open Competition.

Part II: Simplified Acquisitions

Simplified Acquisitions is the term given for purchases between $3,000.00 and $150,000.00. For discussion purposes, we have broken out this category into two different sections; those purchases between $3,000.00 and $25,000.00 and those between $25,000.00 and $150,000.00.

Purchases between $3,000.00 and $25,000.00

  • Recommended as a "Foot in the Door" to Government Contracts
  • Government Must Solicit Three Sources (Either Orally or in Writing)
  • Purchases Are Reserved Exclusively for Small Business Concerns
  • 8(a) Procedures May Be Used [Only One Source Would Be Contacted, If 8(a)]

Purchases between $25,000.00 and $150,000.00

  • Purchases Are Reserved Exclusively for Small Business Concerns
  • 8(a) Procedures May Be Used (Only One Source Would Be Contacted and Synopsis Would Not Be Required)

For additional information, please see the Treasury listing of Bureau Simplified Acquisition Contacts.

For the acquisition of services over $25,000 up to $150,000, Treasury has an exception to the above requirement. Please contact the Bureau Small Business Specialist for further details.

Part II: Simplified Acquisition Awards

  • Locate the buying offices that purchase your product or service by reviewing Treasury’s Forecast of Contract Opportunities and contacting the appropriate Small Business Specialist. Also request the names of contacts within the procurement office who can provide further assistance or contact Treasury’s Bureau Simplified Acquisition Contacts.
  • Visit Treasury's Small Business Specialists at our Monthly Vendor Outreach Sessions. Find out how often your products or services are purchased; how offices maintain their source lists; how often the list is rotated; and how the Treasury bureaus do business.
  • Enter your company information and provide a profile in the System for Award Management (SAM) system. When entering information under business size, be sure to indicate small business as well as your other socioeconomic categories that are applicable to your company. When you indicate small business, you will also be included in SBA's ProNet database which has now merged with SAM. At the end of the SAM registration, you will be asked to submit keywords and a capability narrative to be added to your company information for ProNet. From this list, your company may be notified about potential contract opportunities. The database is a powerful marketing tool for small businesses; however, registering on the database does not guarantee that you will receive a federal contract.
  • Submit capability statements to simplified acquisition procurement offices and to the bureau Small Business Specialist to inform them of your company's capabilities. Your statement should include specific information on the type of products or services your company provides, a listing of your North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) codes, and references of previous customers. To assist you in identifying your NAICS codes, you may examine a list of NAICS codes online.

Part II: Subcontracting Opportunities

Recognizing that small firms often do not have the capacity to perform as a prime contractor on certain large contracts, the Department of the Treasury actively promotes the involvement of small business at the subcontract level. In accordance with Public Law 95-507, all contracts over $550,000 for supplies, equipment and services and $1,000,000 for construction must have a subcontracting plan approved by the Director, Office of Small Business Development or his designee prior to contract award. (Note: awards made to small business concerns are exempt from this requirement.) The subcontracting plan includes goals for subcontract awards to small, small disadvantaged, women-owned, HUBZone, service disabled veteran owned and veteran owned firms, and an annual report on what was achieved is submitted through SBA to the President.

Marketing Tips for Subcontracting Opportunities

  • Contact prime contractors' small business representatives for prime buying needs for current and upcoming contracts. Market the prime contractor as you would other customers and remember that prime contractors have subcontracting goals to meet for small business participation.

Part II: Formal Contract Procedures

Purchases over $150,000.00 typically use formal contract procedures (but Simplified Acquisition Procedures can be used if the product or service is a Commercial Item less than $5 Million)

  1. A Business Should Be Economically Sound and Knowledgeable about the Mechanics, Rules and Regulations of Procurement Before Attempting to Bid on a Federal Contract. Contracts Awarded over $150,000 Are Very Competitive
  2. A Thorough Knowledge of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Is Invaluable
  3. Publicizing the Requirement in FedBizOpps Advertisement Is Required
  4. Either a Sealed Bid or a Negotiated Procurement Can Be Used to Solicit Prices and Technical Responses
  5. Procurements expected to exceed $150,000 (using open market procedures) are reviewed using the following considerations:
    1. 8(a) Program [general rule of thumb: up to $4,000,000 ($7,000,000 for manufacturing), use 8(a) program on sole-source basis; over $4,000,000 ($7,000,000 for manufacturing)], use 8(a) program on competitive basis if 8(a) “rule of two” is met - see FAR 19.8
    2. HUBZone Small Business Set-Aside Program (competitive) - reserved for HubZone small businesses if HUBZone "rule of 2" is met or HUBZone Small Business Sole-Source Program - reserved for a HUBZone small business if only one HUBZone small business can satisfy the requirement [threshold: up to $4,000,000 ($7,000,000 for manufacturing)] - see FAR 19.13
    3. Service Disabled Veteran-owned Small Business (SDVOSB) Set-Aside Program (competitive) - reserved for SDVOSB if "rule of 2" is met or SDVOSB Sole-Source Program - reserved for a SDVOSB small business if only one SDVOSB small business can satisfy the requirement [threshold: up to $4,000,000 ($6,500,000 for manufacturing)] - see FAR 19.14
    4. Women-owned Small Business Set-Aside Program where WOSB or EDWOSB are under represented in NAICS identified by the SBA - see FAR 19.15. No dollar limits associated with this set-aside program
    5. Small Business Set-Aside Program - reserved for small businesses if small business "rule of 2" is met - see FAR 19.5
    6. Full and Open Competition (aka Unrestricted Competition) – if applicable, use price evaluation adjustment for small disadvantaged business concerns and price evaluation preference for HUBZone small business concerns

Part II: Sealed Bidding

Sealed bidding is a method of contracting that employs competitive bids, public opening of bids, and awards. Each sealed bid includes technical specifications, delivery or completion dates, place and method of delivery, nature and number of reports or manuals which may be required, operational tests and instructions, and other items which should be considered in submitting a bid. The terms and conditions are set forth in detail as are the date, hour, and place where bids will be publicly opened and recorded. Contract clauses are generally incorporated by reference. Unless specifically authorized, a telegraphic or alternate bid will not be considered.

Part II: Negotiated Procurement

Most Treasury procurement dollars are spent under negotiated procedures. Compared to sealed bidding, negotiation is a more flexible procedure that includes the receipt of proposals from offerors, permits negotiation, and usually affords offerors an opportunity to revise their offers before award of a contract. Negotiation in the sense of discussion, persuasion, alteration of initial assumptions and positions, and give-and-take may apply to price, schedule, technical requirements, type of contract, or other terms of a proposed contract.

Part II: Tips for Formal Contract Awards

  • Verify that the bureau with whom you wish to do business actually buys the goods or services your company can provide by reviewing the Top 25 Listing.
  • Locate the buying offices that purchase your product or service by contacting Treasury’s Small Business Specialists, and by reviewing Treasury’s Forecast of Contract Opportunities. Also request the names of contacts within the procurement office who can provide further assistance.
  • Visit Treasury’s Small Business Specialists at our Monthly Vendor Outreach Session. Find out how often your products or services are purchased; how offices maintain their source lists; and how the Treasury bureaus do business.
  • Submit capability statements to the bureau Small Business Specialist to inform them of your company's capabilities. Your statement should include specific information on the type of products or services your company provides, a listing of your North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) codes, and references of previous customers. To assist you in identifying your NAICS codes, you may examine a list of NAICS codes online.
  • Before submitting a bid or proposal, get to know the Federal Agencies. Obtain available information on past awards, quantities, costs and awardees; become known to potential purchasers, check your financial status, staff capabilities and track record; give your company a competitive edge by exhibiting at trade fairs and sending representatives to procurement conferences; read and contribute to trade journals; join professional associations and civic organizations for networking opportunities. Under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) you may obtain information about previous Treasury contracts. However, prior to requesting information under FOIA, ask the bureau Small Business Specialist what information he/she can provide. Often times, the information is publicly available and you do not need to go through FOIA.

Part II: Small Business Administration and Preferential Contracting Programs

Preferential contracting was first authorized by the Small Business Act of 1953, which set up the Small Business Administration (SBA) to aid and counsel small businesses and to ensure that small firms receive a fair share of Government contracts. Various amendments have significantly expanded and strengthened Federal Government contract and subcontract opportunities for small, minority, women-owned, service disabled veteran owned, veteran owned, and small businesses located in HUBZones.

Small business firms, especially newly formed organizations, are encouraged to contact their nearest Small Business Administration (SBA) office for assistance and to learn of the many programs and opportunities that are available to them. These include contracting and technical assistance as well as financial and management assistance. The various procurement programs provided under the Small Business Act, as amended, are reflected in the following policy statement:

In accordance with the Small Business Act and implemented in regulation at FAR 19.201(a), it is the policy of the Treasury Department to provide maximum practicable opportunities in its acquisitions to small business, veteran-owned small business, service-disabled veteran-owned small business, HUBZone small business, small disadvantaged business, and women-owned small business concerns. Such concerns must also have the maximum practicable opportunity to participate as subcontractors in the contracts awarded by any executive agency, consistent with efficient contract performance.

Part II: Unsolicited Proposals

The Department of the Treasury consists of the Departmental Offices and the operating bureaus. The Departmental Offices are primarily responsible for the formulation of policy and management of Treasury as a whole, while the operating bureaus carry out the specific operations assigned to Treasury.

If your firm can provide a unique and innovative product or service which may be of interest to the Departmental Offices or one or more of these Bureaus, one possible marketing path is through the submission of an unsolicited proposal. You should be aware, however, that most unsolicited proposals are not accepted. If you’re considering an unsolicited proposal, we encourage you to take the following steps before you spend time and effort preparing a proposal:

  • Review Treasury’s Contract Forecast, which is provides a forecast of contract opportunities, historical purchasing data, and subcontracting opportunities.
  • Register on the System for Award Management in order to do business with the government. In addition, USA.gov and SBA.gov provides information on doing business with the Federal Government;
  • Carefully and objectively assess your product/service to ensure that it is, in fact, innovative and unique, and that it is not already commercially available to the government; and
  • Research Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) subpart 15.6 which provides specific criteria that must be met before an unsolicited proposal can be submitted.

If you’ve taken these steps and believe that you can make a valid unsolicited proposal that may be of interest to the Treasury Department, your firm may submit its unsolicited proposal according to the links provided below.

For more information on Unsolicited Proposals, please see the Unsolicited Proposals Frequently Asked Questions page.

Office of the Procurement Executive (Departmental Offices)

Website: https://home.treasury.gov/policy-issues/small-business-programs/small-and-disadvantaged-business-utilization/how-to-do-business-with-treasury/part-ii-unsolicited-proposals

E-mail: OfficeoftheProcurementExecutive@treasury.gov

Bureau of Engraving and Printing

Website: https://www.bep.gov/about-bep/procurement

Bureau of Fiscal Service

Website: http://www.fiscal.treasury.gov/fsfaq/fs_doing_business.htm

Internal Revenue Service

Website: http://www.irs.gov/uac/Guides-for-Doing-Business-with-the-Government

Office of the Comptroller of Currency

Website: http://www.occ.gov/about/contact-us/doing-business-with-occ/index-doing-business-with-the-occ.html

United States Mint

Website: https://www.usmint.gov/about_the_mint/

Part II: Subcontracting Opportunities

Recognizing that small firms often do not have the capacity to perform as a prime contractor on certain large contracts, the Department of the Treasury actively promotes the involvement of small business at the subcontract level. In accordance with Public Law 95-507, all contracts over $550,000 for supplies, equipment and services and $1,000,000 for construction must have a subcontracting plan approved by the Director, Office of Small Business Development or his designee prior to contract award. (Note: awards made to small business concerns are exempt from this requirement.) The subcontracting plan includes goals for subcontract awards to small, small disadvantaged, women-owned, HUBZone, service disabled veteran owned and veteran owned firms, and an annual report on what was achieved is submitted through SBA to the President.

Marketing Tips for Subcontracting Opportunities

  • Contact prime contractors' small business representatives for prime buying needs for current and upcoming contracts. Market the prime contractor as you would other customers and remember that prime contractors have subcontracting goals to meet for small business participation.

Part II: Procurement Procedures

The Department of the Treasury purchases its supplies, materials, equipment, and services on a decentralized basis primarily through the bureau headquarters procurement offices. Purchases are also made at some field purchasing offices and are also made by individual cardholders throughout each bureau using the purchase card program.

Part III: Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization

Jose Arrieta
Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization
Department of the Treasury
1500 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20220
 

The Director is responsible for the effective implementation of the Small Business Act in Treasury’s procurement program. The Director and staff assists, counsels and advises small business firms, small disadvantaged business firms, HUBZone small business firms, women-owned small business firms, economically disadvantaged women-owned small business firms,veteran owned small business firms, and service disabled veteran owned small business firms on procedures for contracting with the Department. This office also publishes additional informational literature on Treasury's procurement opportunities. Small Business Specialists are appointed in Treasury bureaus to provide more information to small business firms desiring to sell to Treasury organizations.

For additional information, please review

Forecast of Contract Opportunities

Part III: Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization

The Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) is responsible for the development and implementation of an effective program of activities directed at ensuring small, HUBZone small, small disadvantaged, women-owned small, veteran owned small, and service disabled veteran owned small business participation in the Department’s direct procurement and subcontract opportunities.

The OSDBU monitors all Department of the Treasury procurement activities that involve the participation of small business concerns, including the goal setting and procurement practices of all Treasury bureaus. It also negotiates prime and subcontract procurement goals with the Small Business Administration. Mediating and resolving sensitive procurement related issues are also a function of the OSDBU . It also is responsible for implementing Treasury's Mentor-Protégé Program, Success Partnerships.

The OSDBU serves an important function in assisting firms in their marketing of the Department and all of the bureaus. To this end, the OSDBU sponsors a monthly Vendor Outreach Session to enable small businesses to meet the bureau small business specialists and discuss upcoming procurement opportunities. The OSDBU also oversees the planning and management of the annual OSDBU Directors Procurement Conference held each Spring to assist firms in marketing their companies to both procurement and program officials.

Part III: Competition Advocacy Program

The Department of the Treasury is firmly committed to competition. In compliance with the Competition in Contracting Act of 1984 (P.L. 98-369), an aggressive competition advocacy program has been established to ensure that competition is promoted throughout the Department. The following individual serves as Treasury’s Advocate for competition. Additionally, an advocate for competition has been appointed at each Treasury Bureau to serve as a focal point for furthering competitive initiatives within that Bureau.

Steven Kvalevog
Advocate for Competition
Department of the Treasury
Telephone: (202) 441-5171
Email: steven.kvalevog@treasury.gov

Part III: Small Business Opportunities

Special consideration is given to small businesses. Every effort is made to insure that small businesses receive a fair share of Treasury prime contracts and subcontracts. The Small Business Administration (SBA) defines what constitutes a "small business" in a specific industry. The Treasury contracting offices, when soliciting bids or proposals, will specify the size for the particular procurement involved and require a written statement as to whether the bidder meets that standard. Business size standards are published in SBA's regulations at Title 13, CFR, Part 121. You may obtain further information on size standards for your industry by contacting the Small Business Administration.

If you own, operate or represent a small business, you should contact the bureau Small Business Specialists for marketing assistance and information. The Small Business Specialists will advise you as to what types of acquisitions are either currently available or will be available in the near future. A Forecast of Contract Opportunities is published each year by the Department and includes upcoming procurement information for each of the ten bureaus.

In keeping with national policy, the Department of the Treasury works closely with the SBA to help small concerns (of all types) participate in Federal procurements. Also, Treasury has a small business class set-aside program designed to ensure that small businesses receive a fair share of our repetitive procurements. This class set-aside program means that Treasury procurements for services and construction up to certain dollar amounts are reserved for small businesses. For additional information, please contact the Bureau Small Business Specialists.

Small business firms, especially newly formed organizations, are encouraged to contact their nearest SBA office for assistance and to learn of the many excellent programs and opportunities that are available to them.

Part III: Departmental Procurement Policy

Iris Cooper
Director, Office of the Procurement Executive
Department of the Treasury
1500 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20220
Telephone (202) 622-1039

The Director develops Treasury-wide policies and procedures for procurement, provides program direction to bureaus and coordinates their procurement activities. The Office of Procurement also conducts activities to promote competition, encourages the use of small business contractors, assists bureaus in identifying vendors, provides training on procurement methods and oversees bureau operations to ensure that procurements are conducted in a fair and equitable manner.

Part IV: Treasury Bureau Who's Who

Bureau of Tax and Trade
Comptroller of the Currency
Headquarters Operations
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Internal Revenue Service
United States Mint
Financial Crimes Enforcement Network

Alcohol and Tobacco of Tax and Trade [TTB Home Page]

Patrick C. Walker

Director, Acquisition and Facilities Management Division

Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau
1310 G Street, NW, Box 12
Washington, DC 20005

Kathy Estep
Bureau Chief Procurement Officer
Bureau of the Fiscal Service

401 14th Street, SW, 2nd Floor
Washington, DC 20227


[For information on business opportunities, please contact Cheryl Rice-Henderson at (202) 453-1038.]

Comptroller of the Currency [OCC Home Page]

Marguerite Russell

Acting Director, Acquisition Management Division
Comptroller of the Currency
400 - 7th Street, SW
Washington, DC 20219
(202) 649-6608

[For information on business opportunities, please contact Rhonda Trent at (202) 649-6460

Headquarters Operations [Headquarters Operations Home Page]

Stuart Burns
Director, Procurement
Internal Revenue Service
New Carrollton Federal Building
5000 Ellin Road, Stop C7-148
Lanham, MD 20706
(202) 317-7500

[For information on business opportunities, please contact LaTonya Bowman (240) 613-8600.]

Bureau of Engraving and Printing [BEP Home Page]

Ernest Dilworth
Chief, Office of Procurement
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
14th and C Streets, SW, Room 705A
Washington, DC 20228
(202) 874-3236

[For information on business opportunities, please contact Bernadine Stewart at (202) 874-3236.]

Bureau of the Fiscal Service [BFS Home Page]

Kathleen Estep
Bureau Chief Procurement Officer

401 14th Street, SW, 2nd Floor
Washington, DC 20227

[For information on business opportunities, please contact Kimberly Witcher at (202) 874-5213.], or

P.O. Box 1328
200 3rd Street; Avery 5F
Parkersburg, WV 26106-1328
[For information on business opportunities, please contact Loretta Osuna-Cotto at (304) 480-8717.]

Internal Revenue Service [IRS Home Page]

National Office

Stuart Burns
Director, Procurement
Internal Revenue Service
New Carrollton Federal Building
5000 Ellin Road, Stop C7-148
Lanham, MD 20706
(202) 317-7500

[For information on business opportunities, please contact LaTonya Bowman at (240) 613-8600.]

Northeast Area

Peter Dinicola
Area Chief Procurement Officer
Northeast Procurement Branch
290 Broadway, 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10007-1867
(212) 436-1471

[For information on business opportunities, please contact Cheryl Richardson at (212) 436-1518.]

Southeast Area

Charisse Jackson
Acting Area Chief Procurement Officer
Southeast Procurement Branch
2888 Woodcock Blvd., Suite 300, Stop 80-N
Atlanta, GA 30341
(404) 338-9220

[For information on business opportunities, please contact Sandra Dubose at (404) 338-9221.]

Mid-States Area

Anthony McCoy
Area Chief Procurement Officer
Mid-States Procurement Branch
4050 Alpha Road, 1045-NDAL, 9th Floor
Dallas, TX 75244-4203
(469) 801-0780

[For information on business opportunities, please contact Carla Griffin at (469) 801-0774.]

Western Area

Hal Davis
Area Chief Procurement Officer
Western Procurement Branch
1301 Clay Street, Suite 810 South
Oakland, CA 94612
(510) 637-2151

[For information on business opportunities, please contact Denise Alvarez at (510) 637-2133.]

United States Mint [U.S. Mint Home Page]

Ms. Deborah Smith
Assistant Director for Procurement
U.S. Mint
801 - 9th Street, NW, 7th Floor
Washington, DC 20220
(202) 354-7825

[For information on business opportunities, please contact Pauletta Rawlings at (202) 354-8334.]

Financial Crimes Enforcement Network [FINCEN Home Page]

Office of Financial Management

Management Division

P.O. Box 39

Vienna, VA 22183-0039

Kathy Estep
Bureau Chief Procurement Officer
Bureau of the Fiscal Service

401 14th Street, SW, 2nd Floor
Washington, DC 20227

[The Small Business Specialist position is currently vacant]