Looking for rental assistance?

Renters and landlords can find out what emergency rental assistance covers, how it works, and who’s eligible on the interagency housing portal hosted by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB).

Example screens for ERA program online applications

Treasury is providing example reference screens to help grantees with implementing ERA program online applications. These are the first in a series of examples demonstrating best practices for service delivery and can be an inspiration for how grantees may iterate and evolve their applications and programs to better serve tenants and landlords.

These example pages can be used by program administrators and staff or vendors in building or modifying ERA applications. The goal is to demonstrate ways grantees and their partners can create more user-friendly, succinct, and plain language applications.

Example eligibility screens

As described in Treasury's FAQs, grantees must determine who is eligible to receive rental assistance. The following screens show examples of each of the conditions of eligibility. Treasury understands that aspects of these examples will need to be adapted to meet their localized needs and program requirements.

Within these examples is a documentation strategy that leverages self-attestation within the ERA application itself. These can be a model that grantees may be able to learn from and use to help reduce their processing bottlenecks, barrier bust documentation hurdles for tenants, and therefore, keep people stably housed.

Highlighted within these initial eligibility screens are the practices detailed in “Guidelines for ERA program online applications”. Each of the following examples demonstrates elements of those guidelines.

COVID-19 pandemic impact

Based on conversations with grantees and tenants, it can be difficult to describe and document financial hardship due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Because of this we've used examples to help tenants identify their experiences.

Example screen showing a user interface for handling the COVID-19 pandemic impact eligibility questions for Emergency Rental Assistance. The screen includes annotations A thru E.
Example screen snippet showing a user interface for handling the COVID-19 pandemic impact eligibility language alteration between ERA1 and ERA2.
  1. If an applicant indicates they did not have any expenses "due to" the pandemic then it would be appropriate to prompt them again changing "due to" to "during" in order to meet the eligibility language alteration between ERA1 and ERA2. If the applicant was to answer "Yes" to this follow-on question the same list of checkboxes could be presented.

Residence and monthly rent

The simplest way to capture a tenant’s rental obligation is with a current lease or an equivalent letter from their landlord. However, in many cases tenants may not be in a position to provide these documents. This example shows how in these instances, you can ask for documentation of the rental address and evidence of past rental payments or allow tenants to self-attest.

Example screen showing a user interface for handling the residence and monthly rent eligibility questions for Emergency Rental Assistance. The screen includes annotations F thru H.
  1. If a tenant has a lease or a letter from their landlord there’s no need to ask for further documentation. When documentation of a rental agreement is unavailable, focus on proving residence and monthly rental amount.
  2. Offer document upload. Suggest to applicants what types of documents are acceptable.
Example screen showing a user interface for handling the residence and monthly rent eligibility questions for Emergency Rental Assistance when the applicant does not have documentation. The screen includes annotations H and I.
  1. Hide complexity from an applicant until or unless they must take action. Use progressive disclosure to hide the upload document component and reveal the self-attestation checkbox based on the answer to “Do you have documents that show your past rent payments?”
  2. Allow applicants to progress and self-attest if they cannot provide documentation.

Risk of Housing Instability or Homelessness

This example illustrates progressive disclosure, by revealing one question at a time, dependent on the previous answer the applicant provided.

Applicants indicate they have received a past due or eviction notice and then are asked if they can provide and upload that document. Whereas, applicants who reply that they haven’t received a past due or eviction notice, are instead asked whether they have experienced other housing risks.

Example screen showing a user interface for handling the risk of housing instability or homelessness questions for Emergency Rental Assistance when the applicant can upload documentation.

This example attempts to capture a range of factors that can lead to risk of housing instability or homelessness. The intention is to help tenants see themselves and/or their situation within the checklist options offered and to avoid asking tenants to provide a narrative. Any additional program policy decisions could be captured in this checklist, or other parts of the interface, as needed.

Example screen showing a user interface for handling the risk of housing instability or homelessness questions for Emergency Rental Assistance when the applicant does not have documentation.

Income - Fact-specific proxy

The use of fact-specific proxy describes the scenario where a grantee re-affirms a tenant's income self-attestation by cross-referencing it with income data about a particular population and/or a particular geographic area. This example shows one way grantees can cross-reference household size and income against a proxy data source on the backend, without putting this onus on the applicant. This would require using AMI data from sources such as:

  • Department of Housing and Urban Development’s "Access Individual Income Limits Areas" data
  • American Community Survey (ACS), specifically US Census 2019 5-Year Estimates Tables S1901 and S2503, or the most recent version of that data when available
Example screen showing a user interface for handling the income eligibility questions for Emergency Rental Assistance using a fact-specific proxy.

Income - Categorical eligibility

This example illustrates how you can use proof of a tenant’s participation in another government assistance program to meet the income documentation requirement. Treasury expects that grantees will adjust the list of assistance programs to include programs available in their jurisdiction (e.g. Medicaid, USDA Rural Development, local housing assistance, etc.)

Example screen showing a user interface for handling income eligibility questions for Emergency Rental Assistance when the applicant is categorically eligible.